Teaching

I will be teaching Special Topics in Economics (ECON6101) with a focus on health economics in Semester 2, 2015. This is the preliminary course outline:

Special Topics in Economics: Health Economics and Policy Evaluation

Description:

In this course students will learn to apply the economist’s theoretical framework (both classic and behavioural) and empirical tools to analyse major health and health care issues. Students will learn about (1) international health care systems and how they are being financed, (2) provider and consumer incentives that affect health behaviours and the demand for health care, and (3) the complex interrelationship between  health, health behaviours, and education. An important part of the course will be spent on:  (I) discussing major policy issues such as (a) the introduction of universal health care, (b) co-payments, and (c) incentive payments to providers and patients to battle e.g. obesity and smoking; and (II) learning and applying basic econometric tools to adequately assess important policy reforms. These tools comprise RCTs, econometric techniques, and cost-effectiveness analysis that can be used to put a price tag on a policy reform or bad health behaviours.

The course will run over 3 hours per week over 12 weeks in semester 2. There will be four computer-lab sessions.

Assessment:

Exam (50%)

Midterm exam (20%)

Project (20%): “Evaluating an increase in the GP co-payments in the Australian context”

Assignments (10%)

Pre-requisites:

Quantitative analysis or introductory econometrics or equivalent and microeconomics

References

There is no standard text book, but the course will be loosely based on the following text books in addition to journal articles:

Thomas E. Getzen, Health Economics and Financing, 5th Edition, Wiley.

Frank A. Sloan and Chee-Ruey Hsieh. Health Economics, March 2012. The MIT Press.

Jones, A.M. (ed.) The Elgar Companion to Health Economics Second Edition, Aldershot: Edward Elgar, 2012.

Jones, A.M., Rice, N., Bago d’Uva, T. and Balia, S., Applied Health Economics, Second Edition, London: Routledge, 2012.